2017 – November 24 – Republished from 1917 news from the park

From Larry Smith, Jacksonville, Oregon: The following news items were drawn from the Mail Tribune archives from 100 years ago today. [also published in the 1917 section]

November 24, 1917

A much-welcomed feature at Crater Lake park next summer will be inauguration of burro service and horse service at the park, according to Aleck Sparrow, supervisor of Crater Lake National park. The burros will carry people who wish to go down to the lake and back, but cannot stand the exertion at that altitude, over the new trail from the rim to the water’s edge.

“The department is doing everything possible to attract people to this wonderful but comparatively little-known national park,” said Mr. Sparrow today, “and while much improvement work was done this past season, many improvements are yet to be made. However, Crater Lake is fast coming to the front as one of the world’s wonder places.

“During the past season much construction work was done in Crater Lake National park. Over six miles of road and eight miles of trail were built. The road around the rim will be 35 miles long and will be finished next season. After the construction work is completed it is the intention of the department to hard surface or gravel these roads. The rim road is destined to be one of the finest scenic drives in this country.

“Among the trails built this summer is one along the rim, west from the hotel to the Watchman peak, 5½ miles, with an

unobstructed view of the lake for the entire distance. It is passable for foot or horseback.

“Another trail follows the rim east from the hotel to the top of Garfield peak, 1½ miles, elevation 8,060 feet, where a magnificent view of the lake and surrounding country is obtained.

“The most important trail constructed this year is the one from the hotel to the boat landing, a drop of 900 feet on an approximate grade of 15 percent and 1¼ miles long. This is an easy grade for a trail and has been traversed by horses to the water.

“Two very artistic log cabins were built at the eastern and western entrances to the park.

 

Larry B. Smith
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