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Smith Brothers' Chronological History of Crater Lake National Park

 

   

<< 1912   1913   1914 >>


1913 and 1914


Government Camp built half way between Anna Springs and the Rim. “A comfortable collection of log buildings with steep roofs, snug and comfortable looking”. Office, shelter cabin, warehouse and mess hall. 

January


Oregon Caves National Park bill defeated by Congress.

Spring


Crater Lake Lodge is still under construction. Opening date is delayed yet another year because the winter snows had collapsed the roof into the basement. Most of the roof joists were made of 2x4’s. The designers and builders seemed oblivious to the snow load requirements.

May


In a letter to Superintendent Arant, Interior Secretary Lane informs him that after 11 years in the employ of the government, Arant’s pay will stop on June 30. No reason is given for the dismissal. (Based on letters written by Steel during this period, Steel wanted Arant out of the way so he could assume the post of Superintendent.)

June 5


Superintendent Arant fired as superintendent of the Park by Interior Secretary Lane. Case was appealed to the Supreme Court but Arant lost. Arant claimed he was a civil servant and was immune to changes of political parties. The courts disagreed.

June 7


Will Steel officially appointed the Park’s second superintendent to take effect on July 1. Meanwhile, as he waits for the Arants to vacate the Annie Spring office and residence, Steel, moves into the Hotel. Activities at the Park come to a halt. No orders are forthcoming for needed improvements, no fees are collected, and both Steel and Arant serve notice on the Park Postmaster not to deliver mail addressed to the “other” superintendent. (SOHS)

Steel is still interested in Crater Lake’s concession which was somewhat irregular for a superintendent. Chronic concession troubles continue to plague the Parker operation.

July 21


Former Superintendent Arant, after being fired, refuses to vacate his Annie Spring office. U.S. Marshals are called in to forcibly remove the Arants. Personal property is thrown out onto the ground. “I would like to see somebody try to remove me from my own home.” said Arant, but in less than a minute he was passed through two doors and landed in the front yard. He returned immediately and was again ejected. Marshal Scott removed some of Arant’s personal effects and files, and ushered in Will Steel. Arant then headed for Klamath Falls and returned with his lawyer and several friends. Seeing himself outnumbered, Marshal Scott deputized a force of men working in the Park. The Marshals retreat after Mrs. Arant takes to her bed in the Superintendent’s house. They do not want to dislodge a possibly sick woman. 

After physically removing Arant for the 7th or 8th time, Marshal Scott locks the office doors and Will Steel takes possession of the desk and government papers. (S.O.H.S.)

July 22


Goodbye Bridge, so named by U.S. Marshal Leslie M. Scott because it was the last piece of work in the Park completed by W.F. Arant, the retiring Superintendent, under contract to his brother, . During this time work is begun on the new East Rim and West Rim roads. Planned and engineered by George E. Goodwin. 

Lodge operator Parkhurst knocks out former Superintendent Arant with a blow from an auto wrench at Fort Klamath because of the Steel-Arant superintendent's conflict.

Summer


Construction of a new access road to the Rim is begun. Completed in 1914 along with a new campground.

November


“Dogs are no longer permitted to run loose in the National Parks. Any violators will be shot.”

December 13


Bill introduced in Congress to create a 480 acre Oregon Caves National Park.

1913 Season


W.G. Steel opens up the Dewee Falls area to visitors. There are 1,200 acres of private land in the Park. Fourteen land entries: 8 are patented, 2 approved, 4 unapproved. 6,253 visitors enter the Park with 760 one-dollar auto permits sold along with 13 motorcycle permits. Construction of the handsome stone Lodge building continues. When completed, the new Lodge will replace the temporary wooden hotel on the Rim. Will contain about 60 rooms.  

Steven Mather says, “Crater Lake has been systematically developed by roads and trails more than any other national park except Yellowstone.”

Estimated cost of building roads in Crater Lake: East Rim Road - $79,800; North Road - $68,800; Annie Spring to Headquarters - $94,225 and the Rim Road - $746,700 for a total of : $989,525

Season Visitation: 6,253


<< 1912   1913   1914 >>

 


 

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