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Smith Brothers' Chronological History of Crater Lake National Park

 

   

<< 1917   1918   1919 >>


April 6


Senator McNary of Oregon introduces bill in Congress attempting to add 92,800 acres to Crater Lake National Park, around Diamond Lake, Mt. Thielsen and Mt. Bailey.

May 22


In a letter to Horace Albright, Assistant Director, George Goodwin, Civil Engineer, reports on Alfred Parkhurst’s Lodge operation. Parkhurst was told that the food and service supplied in the Hotel would have to be more satisfactory; and that if he did not or could not do this, the Service would have to take active measures to see that it was done. 

Burros or saddle horses which are advertised as being available for tourist use-These have never been furnished. Not only was Mr. Parkhurst without gasoline for supplying the demand for tourists, but was without gasoline for his own use. Mr. Parkhurst agreed to have a drum of gasoline available at the two Park boundaries to enable tourists to reach the hotel at Annie Creek. The tenting area in connection with the hotel has not been satisfactory, and sometimes last summer tourists went there and Mr. Parkhurst seemed to discourage them and tried to have them take rooms in the hotel instead. Mr. Parkhurst agreed to move several tens from off the edge of the Rim so not to interfere with hotel guests and hikers. Mr. Sparrow is going to have to locate a definite parking area away from the rim, but close to the hotel. People are parking everywhere creating a dusty situation. 

The sanitation conditions at the hotel have not been satisfactory, sometimes owing to the failure of the water system and not having enough water to flush the toilets. The sewage from the hotel is discharged into an already overflowing cesspool that has welled up and runs over the ground, making an odor and unpleasant sight. A suitable fire has not been kept in the fireplaces. With the abundance of wood and the large fine fireplaces they should maintain a large cheery fire at all times. 

The grocery supply was so low that it was impossible for tourists to get many of the necessities which they might expect. Mr. Parkhurst agreed to keep a few bales of hay on hand for the horses. Many times Mr. Parkhurst’s touring and stage autos break down repeatedly subjecting the passengers to very annoying delays. At times Parkhurst would load tourists in the bus in Medford and run errands to the meat market and grocery. There is considerable complaint that there being no one properly qualified to make temporary repairs to cars in the vicinity of the hotel. Repair work would be billed at $1.00 per hour. 

The row boats on the Lake are not in suitable repair and not enough to meet the demand. Parkhurst also agreed to make vegetables and fruits available and supply a better quality of meat and butter. At times Mr. Parkhurst becomes overwhelmed by the details and thus fails to fulfill his promises.

Summer


6,000 acre fire burns in and around the Park. 18 miles of well-constructed dirt roads are now found inside the park. Union Peak Trail constructed. Major addition the Lodge begun.

July 9


Bill to enlarge Crater Lake Park held up in committee. Sheep men object to its grazing exclusion.

August 28


In a letter to Cornelia Marvin, State Librarian, Will Steel describes his place name work: For many years I have been collecting newspaper clippings and other matter on the significance of place names...I have a number of large, well bound scrap books and a great amount of clippings in envelopes, which are not classified...Federal officials...have placed at my disposal, free of cost, a commodious office and large steel vault in the Federal building of Medford, Oregon, for use in classification and for safety.

My official duties as National Park Commissioner are such as to require my presence in the Crater Lake National Park during the Summer season, but, for the rest of the year I am free to go and come as I please.

My salary is not sufficient to permit me to devote my time to the work during the Winter, which I would like to do, but, I am compelled to seek employment such as will bring an additional income. I regret this exceedingly, as I am 64 years of age and cannot expect many more years of activity, hence fear that my long years of plodding will not result for which I have so earnestly hoped. signed: Will Steel.

September 3


The “Rim Boulevard” completes its connection and the first continuous trip around the Lake is made by Alex Sparrow in a Park truck. A water system is installed at the Rim for public use.

October


The grading of the new Rim Road is completed. The first car to make the complete circle is a Ford, from Klamath Falls.

Season: 13,231 visitors

 

<< 1917   1918   1919 >>

 


 

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