Resources 1984 – VI. Steps Leading Toward Establishment of Crater Lake National Park A. Further Exploration of Crater Lake by Boat

Historic Resource Study, Crater Lake National Park, Oregon, 1984

VI. Steps Leading Toward Establishment of Crater Lake National Park

A. Further Exploration of Crater Lake by Boat

With the more loudly announced “discovery” of Crater Lake by the Sutton party in 1869, its days of relative obscurity were practically over. It would still be another three years, however, before another widely-publicized visit–by Lord [Sir?] William Maxwell of Kirkcudbrightshire, Scotland, and Mr. A. Bentley of Toledo, Ohio, travelers visiting Fort Klamath Accompanied by Dr. Munson, the post surgeon, they headed toward the lake and set up camp below Castle Crest. During their ascension of a ridge between their camp and the lake, Munson began to complain of feeling unwell due to the unaccustomed exertion. He bade the others go on while he rested before returning to camp. His companions found him dead in the same spot hours later in a position of ease, leaning against a boulder. The rocky point on which he died was thereafter referred to as Munson Point, and the valley below and a nearby ridge, creek, and springs were also named in his honor.

A few days later Captain Oliver C. Applegate of Fort Klamath led Bentley and Maxwell, a John Meacham (Mecham), and a Chester M. Sawtelle to the lake. After several laborious hours and unexpected dangers and hardships the men placed upon the water the first boat to make an extended inspection tour. After visiting Wizard Island, where they found the notes left by the Sutton expedition, they cruised the perimeter of the lake, naming some of the more obvious peaks after each other. The prominence now known as The Watchman was dubbed Bentley Peak; Hillman Peak (earlier Glacier Peak) was called Maxwell Peak; and the name Applegate Peak was given to a point on today’s Vidae Cliff. [1]

 

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