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Glaciation of Crater Lake National Park

While the fact is not widely appreciated, the existing remnant of old Mount Mazama affords an excellent field for the study of glacial erosion.

The Volcano smolders beneath it's icy cover, painting by Eugene Kingman, 1930s.

Glaciers were born on the slopes of the Volcano, painting by Eugene Kingman, 1930s.

The glaciers reached their maximum size some 25,000 years ago at the end of the Pleistocene Epoch, obtaining a depth of 1,000 feet and extending 10 to 17 miles from the summit.

During the final retreat, when the glaciers were confined to the canyon bottoms of the upper slopes, a semicircular line of parasitic volcanoes developed on the northern slope of the mountain, about 5,000 feet below the summit, what is now the rim of caldera. [Crater Lake National Park General Management Plan, December 1977, Part 2, pp. 2, 4]

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