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Hillman Peak - Prominent Geological Features of Crater Lake National Park

 
Hillman Peak is the highest point on the rim, at 8,156 feet elevation. Hillman Peak was formed as a parasitic cone when a vent opened on the side of Mount Mazama. The collapse of the parent peak cut Hillman in half, exposing its inner structure. Its spires are ancient feeder tubes for the lava that built the cone and were decomposed and tinted yellowish-orange by the gases and other hot liquids that rose through them.

Aerial view toward southwest of The Watchman (left) and Hillman Peak (right) from near Devil's Backbone, Crater Lake National Park, Scientific Investigations Map 2832, Sheet 4 of 4, Geologic Map of Mount Mazama and Crater Lake Caldera, Oregon (2008), by Charles R. Bacon

Note: the numbers associated with each feature name above correspond to their place on the Custom Google Map below

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