12843 – Bull Trout Restoration in Crater Lake National Park, Oregon

Investigator’s Annual Reports (IAR’s) for Crater Lake National Park

Bull Trout Restoration in Crater Lake National Park, Oregon

 

Report Number: 12843

Reporting Year: 1999

Permit Number: CRLA1999014

Date Received: Jan 01, 1999

Principal Investigator: Mark Buktenica, National Park Service, Crater Lake, Oregon 97604

Additional investigator(s): Brain Mahoney, Dr Gary Larson, Scott Girdner

Park-assigned Study Id. # CRLA1999014

Permit Expiration Date: Jan 01, 1999

Permit Start Date: Jan 01, 1999

Study Starting Date: Jan 01, 1992

Study Ending Date: Jan 01, 2001

Study Status: Completed

Activity Type: Other

Subject/Discipline: Fish / Ichthyology

Objectives: Restore native bull trout to historic numbers and distribution in Sun Creek, within the park, remove non-native brook trout, and prevent re-invasion of non-native species in the future.

Findings and Status: Bull trout are the only native fish in Crater Lake National Park. In 1989, biologists discovered that bull trout had been drastically reduced, and restricted to a small section of one creek in the park because of the introduction of non-native brook trout. The bull trout’s survival in the park was jeopardized due to competition and hybridization with the introduced brook trout. To ensure their survival, a bull trout restoration plan was written and reviewed by a panel of national experts in October 1991. The long-term goals of the plan were to: 1) restore the remnant population of bull trout to historic numbers and distribution in Sun Creek; 2) eradicate brook trout, and 3) prevent re-invasion of non-native fish. Restoration fieldwork began in 1992. Barriers were constructed to prevent re-invasion of non-native fish. Biologists used a combination of techniques to remove brook trout, including electroshocking, snorkel diving, trap nets, and the fish toxin Antimycin. Because of these efforts, bull trout populations increased from approximately 200 individuals in 1992 to 600 in 1999, and they have reclaimed approximately 7 miles of the creek.

For this study, were one or more specimens collected and removed from the park but not destroyed during analyses? No

Funding provided this reporting year by NPS: 0

Funding provided this reporting year by other sources: 60000

Full name of college or university: n/a

Annual funding provided by NPS to university or college this reporting year: 0

 

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