26142 – Effects of Prescribed Burning on Mycorrhizal Fungi in Crater Lake National Park

Investigator’s Annual Reports (IAR’s) for Crater Lake National Park

Effects of Prescribed Burning on Mycorrhizal Fungi in Crater Lake National Park

 

Report Number: 26142

Permit Number: CRLA-2003-SCI-0002

Current Status: Checked in

Date Received: Jan 19, 2004

Reporting Year: 2003

Principal Investigator: Dr Kermit Cromack, Jr., Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR

Additional investigator(s): Dr. Efren Cazares, Dr. James Trappe, Matt Trappe

Park-assigned Study Id. #: CRLA-03026

Permit Expiration Date: Oct 31, 2006

Permit Start Date: Jul 07, 2003

Study Starting Date: Jun 07, 2003

Study Ending Date: Oct 31, 2006

Study Status: Continuing

Activity Type: Research

Subject/Discipline: Fire (Behavior, Ecology, Effects)

Objectives: This research is proposed to examine effects of prescribed fire on the fruiting of ectomycorrhizal fungal at Crater Lake National Park. Fruiting bodies do not perfectly reflect the entire belowground diversity of ectomycorrhizal fungi but serve as a useful and cost-effective indicator of ectomycorrhizal community response to fire. Moreover, they are important in diets of wildlife and hence a major response variable to evaluate effects of fire on wildlife habitat. The goal is to evaluate the effect of spring and fall burns on the fruiting of ectomycorrhizal fungi and relate these effects to vegetative and soil characteristics.

The overall objective of this study is to quantify effects of early and late spring versus fall burning on the ectomycorrhizal fungus community composition as reflected by fruiting-body production. The study is designed to answer these specific questions:

  1. How does season of burn relate to amount and species composition of mycorrhizal fungus sporocarp production?
  2. How does intensity of burn relate to amount and species composition of sporocarp production?
  3. How does burn-induced change in ground vegetation relate to amount and species composition of to sporocarp production?
  4. How does burn-induced canopy cover change relate to amount and species composition of sporocarp production?
  5. How does burn-induced change in selected soil properties relate to amound and species composition of sporocarp production?
  6. How do factors 1-5 relate to spring vs. autumn fruiting species?
  7. How do factors 1-5 relate to time since burning?
  8. How do factors 1-5 interact?

A secondary objective will be to assess the treatment variables on presence of visible, dense colonies of ectomycorrhizal fungi (termed fungal mats) in the soil. Mats are often concentrated in the upper soil horizons and hence may be particularly sensitive to fire. Questions 1-8 for sporocarp production will also be addressed for mats.

Findings and Status: Sixteen plots (four each of the four treatments; early spring burn, late spring burn, fall burn, and unburned control) were surveyed for above- and belowground mycorrhizal fungi in the spring and again in the fall or 2003. All collections were described, dried, and vouchered. Identification of every collection to species level is being performed by microscopic and genetic analysis.

For this study, were one or more specimens collected and removed from the park but not destroyed during analyses? Yes

Funding provided this reporting year by NPS: 0

Funding provided this reporting year by other sources: 53000

Full name of college or university: Oregon State University

Annual funding provided by NPS to university or college this reporting year: 0

 

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