Proceedings – THE RESEARCH RESERVE AND ITS PART IN THE PARK EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM

Proceedings of the First Park Naturalists’ Training Conference, November 1 to 30, 1929

 RESEARCH RESERVES

THE RESEARCH RESERVE AND ITS PART IN THE PARK EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM

By Dorr G. Yeager

To my way of thinking there is a vital necessity for areas in our parks which are absolutely undisturbed by man. This need may or may not be fulfilled by the so-called Research Reserve.

These areas might well play an important part in our nature studies. This would be, of course, the primary use to which they would be put. This study can be divided up into several parts:

(1) As ecological study areas – where as near a natural state as possible has been maintained.

(2) As an animal and bird reserve – where animals and birds may be studied in their natural conditions. In Yellowstone there is practically no such thing as a grizzly in his natural state. This is the result of too many bear feeding grounds and road camps where the obtaining of food is a simple and unnatural function.

(3) As natural botanical gardens – where plant succession can be studied without the elements of man or exotic species entering in.

I realize that the above three points are comparable to those which will probably be listed under “Uses”. They are, however, ways in which they will function to aid our work.

The information which they will enable us to procure will be of Service in many ways

(1) In working up wild life observations.

(2) In animal research when comparison between natural and unnatural conditions must be made.

(3) In making records as to the influx or disappearance of animals from this area.

 

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